Politics

Ukraine war live updates: G7 to announce security guarantees for Ukraine; Kremlin ‘struck’ by speed of Sweden, Finland NATO accession

Zelenskyy pushes for security guarantees in the absence of NATO membership

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy outlined three priorities for his country during the NATO summit in Vilnius.

Speaking to journalists, he named weapons packages, an invitation to join NATO, and a guarantee of security measures from allies as priority items on his agenda.

On the invitation to NATO, he said, “We want to be on the same page with everybody, with all the understanding, and for today what we hear and understand that we’ll have this invitation when security measures will allow, so I want to discuss with our partners all these things.”

Zelenskyy stressed the need for “security guarantees for Ukraine on the way to NATO.” He expressed frustration at the alliance on Tuesday over its lack of a clear timeline for Ukraine’s future accession to NATO, something that several other members have been hesitant about due to the risk of pulling the wider group into war with Russia. Leaders of other NATO states including the U.S. and Germany said that an invitation to join the organization would come after peace in Ukraine was established and certain security conditions had been met.

— Natasha Turak

G7 to announce long-term security framework for Ukraine

British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak at the NATO Summit in Vilnius, Lithuania, on July 11, 2023.

Pool | Getty Images News | Getty Images

G7 nations are expected to announce a framework guaranteeing Ukraine’s long-term security on Wednesday, bloc member London said in an emailed statement.

“The joint declaration, expected to be signed by all members of the G7, will set out how allies will support Ukraine over the coming years to end the war and deter and respond to any future attack,” Downing Street said.

“As Ukraine makes strategic progress in their counteroffensive, and the degradation of Russian forces begins to infect Putin’s front line, we are stepping up our formal arrangements to protect Ukraine for the long term,” British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak said.

He is currently attending a July 11-12 NATO summit in Vilnius, Lithuania, where members of the defense alliance have set aid to Ukraine at the top of the agenda.

“Supporting their progress on the pathway to NATO membership, coupled with formal, multilateral, and bilateral agreements and the overwhelming support of NATO members will send a strong signal to President Putin and return peace to Europe,” Sunak said.

Ruxandra Iordache

Russia launches air strike against Kyiv for second day

Russian forces launched an air attack against Ukrainian capital Kyiv for the second consecutive night, the Kyiv military administration said on Telegram, according to a Google translation.

“After a break of more than a week, the enemy launched Iranian drones over Kyiv for the second day in a row. The air alert lasted more than 2 hours,” it said.

The military force claimed it destroyed enemy targets and shared no information on casualties and damage sustained at this time.

In Google-translated comments on Telegram, the Ukrainian air force said that Russian troops attacked Ukraine overnight from the north-eastern direction, using Iranian-made Shahed-136/131. A total of 15 drones participated in the strike, the force detailed, without specifying the number of units involved in the attack against Kyiv.

CNBC could not independently verify developments on the ground.

Ruxandra Iordache

Latest Russia attacks could be ‘demonstrative response’ to the NATO Vilnius summit, ISW says

Russia’s latest military offensives, including air strikes against Ukrainian capital Kyiv, may be a “demonstrative response” to the Vilnius summit of the U.S.-led NATO alliance, which is meeting again today, the Institute for the Study of War said in its Tuesday report.

“Russia’s drone strikes on port infrastructure also coincide with the first day of the NATO summit in Vilnius and are likely intended to discourage NATO members from providing more military aid to Ukraine,” the think tank said.

NATO nations have unanimously expressed support for Ukraine, although Kyiv’s membership bid has yet to progress.

“Russia may be threatening the Black Sea grain deal to message the deal’s original broker, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, that his recent statement of support for Ukraine’s NATO membership and the return of the five Ukrainian Azovstal commanders on July 7 has not gone unnoticed and is not appreciated by the Kremlin,” the ISW added.

Turkey on Monday finally endorsed the entry of Sweden into the military coalition — an accession that the Kremlin has warned could have “negative consequences.”

Ruxandra Iordache

Zelenskyy gets warm reception at NATO, but remains frustrated

Volodymyr Zelenskyy, president of Ukraine, arrives with his wife, Olena Zelenska, for a public address in the Lithuanian capital on the sidelines of the NATO summit.

Kay Nietfeld | Picture Alliance | Getty Images

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy and first lady Olena Zelenska arrived in Lithuania’s capital on Tuesday as the NATO summit convenes and leaders discuss ongoing support for Kyiv amid Russia’s ongoing war.

The group’s secretary-general, Jens Stoltenberg, stressed that Ukraine would receive a “strong, positive message on the path forward” regarding its membership.

But Zelenskyy remains frustrated that NATO has failed to lay out a timeline or give specific details for his country’s future NATO membership, calling it “unprecedented and absurd” on Telegram.

Kyiv has been pushing for accession into NATO following Russia’s full-scale invasion, but officials of the security alliance have previously said its membership is unlikely to proceed while war is waged on Ukrainian territories.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy (C) addresses the crowd next to his wife Olena Zelenska (L) and Lithuania’s President Gitanas Nauseda at Lukiskiu Square in Vilnius on July 11, 2023, during a NATO Summit. (Photo by Odd ANDERSEN / AFP) (Photo by ODD ANDERSEN/AFP via Getty Images)

Odd Andersen | Afp | Getty Images

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky addresses a crowd at Lukiskiu Square in Vilnius on July 11, 2023, during a NATO Summit.

Odd Andersen | AFP | Getty Images

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky (C) gets a hug by Lithuania’s President Gitanas Nauseda after addressing the crowd at Lukiskiu Square in Vilnius on July 11, 2023, during a NATO Summit. 

Petras Malukas | AFP | Getty Images

— Michele Luhn and Amanda Macias

Kremlin ‘struck’ by speed of Finland and Sweden’s NATO ascension

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov’s latest comments come as he carries out a tour of Latin American countries this week, a trip seen as a way for Russia to cement its alliances with countries in the region.

Anadolu Agency | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said the Kremlin was “struck” by the speed with which “neutral status” countries such as Finland and Sweden opted to join the NATO military alliance.

“We were struck by the speed that both Finland and Sweden renounced their neutral status, renounced the advantages that this neutral status provided them for many decades, provided them with relatively independent role, provided them with a reputation and authority both in Europe and on the international stage,” Lavrov told reporters in Moscow during a press conference with visiting Omani Foreign Minister Sayyid Badr al-Busaidi.

Lavrov also said that Finland and Sweden have given up “special trade and economic investment and other relations with the Russian Federation” by joining NATO.

Lavrov’s comments follow NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg’s announcement that Sweden would become the 32nd member to join the military alliance. Finland became a NATO member in April.

— Amanda Macias

Kyrylo Barashkov shows off his own bunker in Kyiv

Kyrylo Barashkov, a 43-year-old immigration lawyer, in his own bunker in Kriukivschina, a small town near Kyiv on July 10, 2023. After several missiles exploded near his house outside Kyiv, Kyrylo Barashkov decided the only way to keep his family safe was to build his own bunker.

Kyrylo Barashkov, 43-year-old immigration lawyer, kindles a fire in his bunker in Kriukivschina, a small town near Kyiv on July 10, 2023. 

Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images

Kyrylo Barashkov, 43-year-old immigration lawyer, kindles a fire in his bunker in Kriukivschina, a small town near Kyiv on July 10, 2023. 

Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images

Kyrylo Barashkov, 43-year-old immigration lawyer, kindles a fire in his bunker in Kriukivschina, a small town near Kyiv on July 10, 2023. 

Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images

Kyrylo Barashkov, 43-year-old immigration lawyer, kindles a fire in his bunker in Kriukivschina, a small town near Kyiv on July 10, 2023. 

Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images

Kyrylo Barashkov, 43-year-old immigration lawyer, kindles a fire in his bunker in Kriukivschina, a small town near Kyiv on July 10, 2023. 

Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images

— Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images

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